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Back To Golf
(NC)-It's true that many golfers suffer from back pain. If you are one of them but love the game, you can have it both ways. It just takes some practice and patience.

Trunk rotation - at least the lack of it - is the most common problem for golfers who are prone to back pain. The more skilled and flexible you are, the more you can rely on your hips and trunk to rotate when you swing. This is the crux of the matter. A great golf shot requires hip and trunk rotation because that's what gives power to your shots. If you don't rotate well, your arms - and especially your back - will have to do a lot of extra work.


If you're a seasonal golfer it's normal to experience some aches and pains during the first few rounds of play. Here are some basic tips for the beginning of the season in particular... although you should keep them in mind whenever you play.




Walk the course when possible; a golf bag which you can wear backpack style distributes the weight far better than one which you sling over your shoulder. (Bouncing around in a golf cart can make back pain a lot worse. Riding also allows your body to cool down and tighten up between holes.)


Take extra time to stretch and warm up before you begin to play.


Take practice swings throughout the round to keep your muscles warm and limber.


Limit your time on the driving range - some of the most common injuries are caused by overuse of muscles.


Talk to your golf pro. He/she can show you how to make some mechanical adjustments to your swing that will put less stress on your back.


If your back hurts, take a few days off from the course . . . but try to maintain some level of physical activity. Check with your doctor, of course, but these days most health care professionals who deal with back pain do not recommend long term bedrest.


Always bend your knees to tee your ball, replace divots, fix ball marks and lift a heavy golf bag because bending incorrectly dozens of times adds up.


Strength, flexibility and endurance are the three most important things to keep in mind, especially if you are a chronic back pain sufferer.


If you suffer from back pain, a regular exercise program is a must. For more information as well as exercises designed specifically for golfers, visit www.backrelief.com.